• Tennis Injuries

    Tennis, played worldwide, is one of the most popular racket sports. A high number of tournaments for competitive tennis players may lead to overuse injuries, such as “tennis elbow” or wrist injuries. For noncompetitive tennis players, improper or inadequate physical and technique training may be the cause of overuse injuries. Although overuse injuries make up a large chunk of tennis injuries, the good news is that such injuries can be prevented with some changes to technique and training routines.

  • Loading the player...

    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses impingement syndrome in tennis.
    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses impingement syndrome in tennis.
  • Loading the player...

    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses wrist tendonitis in tennis.
    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses wrist tendonitis in tennis.
  • Loading the player...

    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses calf strain in tennis.
    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses calf strain in tennis.
  • Loading the player...

    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses knee ligament strain in tennis.
    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses knee ligament strain in tennis.
  • Loading the player...

    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses the RICE regime in tennis.
    Carl Petersen, physiotherapist, discusses the RICE regime in tennis.
  • Shoulder impingement in tennis

    he head of the humerus has to come up and clear an arch of tissue which is called the acromial arch.If because of poor posture or swelling in the tendons or the bursa it will often become impinged and cause jamming of the shoulder joint. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder can easily occur in tennis due to the repetitive nature of the overhead strokes. Impingement syndrome in the shoulder will often be felt in a lateral aspect and it’s an inability to raise the arm up without feeling pain in this area of the shoulder.

                              

    If you suspect you’ve got shoulder impingement syndrome, you should go see your physiotherapist and they will give you a variety of different exercises and advice about how to better deal with this sports injury. Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

    Now Health Network  Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

  • Tennis - RICE

    In dealing with injuries on an immediate basis, we usually follow the RICE or the PRICE principle or philosophy.  Often seeing a local family physician or a physiotherapist in conjunction with a registered dietitian and athletic therapist is a great option to take control of this condition. Smart Food Now and exercise is also optominal for overall health.   

    The PRICE principle is made up of five different methods that can help treat an acute sports injury (an injury caused by a single event, leThe P is for protection. You want to protect the injured joint or muscle.

    We use R for rest - or modified rest, which is more applicable. Ice is the third part of the PRICE Principle. The C is for compression, which puts some pressure around the tissue and minimizes the amount of bleeding into the tissue, which will minimize the scar tissue and adhesions that are forming. The final method included in the principle is elevation. If you have questions about the RICE principle, contact your local physiotherapist.

    Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

    Now Health Network Local Practitioners: Orthopedic Surgeons 

  • Wrist Injury - Tennis

    Wrist injuries can be common in badminton just because of the speed of the wrist movement as they're flicking the shuttle cock.

    Wrist tendonitis can affect any of the muscles that run from the forearm up into the hand because they form tendons in this region here. Because of the nature of the forehand and backhand strokes, you'll get some overuse in those tendons and those muscles, you'll develop some swelling. There may also be redness over the area and it will be quite painful to touch.

    If you suspect you have wrist tendonitis, obviously you're going to want to in the first 24 to 48 hours follow the PRICE or the RICE principle. So that means applying ice to the area on a regular basis by utilizing an ice pack or some other form of cold implement.

    But what's most important I think is if you suspcet you have problems is go see your physiotherapist. Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

    Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

  • Wrist Tendonitis - Tennis

    Wrist injuries can be common in tennis just because of the speed of the wrist movement as they're flicking the shuttle cock. Wrist tendonitis can affect any of the muscles that run from the forearm up into the hand because they form tendons in this region here. Because of the nature of the forehand and backhand strokes, you'll get some over use in those tendons and those muscles.

    A player will develop some swelling. There may also be redness over the area and it will be quite painful to touch. If you suspect you have wrist tendonitis, obviously you're going to want to follow the PRICE or the RICE principle in the first 24 to 48 hours. That means applying ice to the area on a regular basis by utilizing an ice pack or some other form of cold implement.

    If you have questions about wrist tendonitis in tennis, contact your local physiotherapist. Often seeing a local family physician or a physiotherapist in conjunction with a registered dietitian and athletic therapist is a great option to take control of this condition. Smart Food Now and exercise is also optominal for overall health.  Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

    Now Health Network  Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

Family Practice Now

Family Practice Now

-->