• Common soccer injuries

    A sprained ankle is the most common injury for  soccer players and accounts for 17% of all injuries in both games and practices, according to the study. Ankle sprains are often caused when you make a sudden stop or change of direction, causing the ankle to twist unnaturally.

    Muscle-tendon injuries to the upper leg. These include injuries to the quadriceps and hamstring muscles.Muscle-tendon injuries to the hip or pelvis. Because of the complex anatomy of this part of the body, injuries to the soft tissues of the hip and pelvis are often described under the general label of sports hernia (athletic pubalgia).Knee injuries.

    Concussion. Since there is a likelihood of player-on-player contact during games, concussions were 14 times more likely to occur during a game than during practice.

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    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses preventing ACL injuries in soccer.
    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses preventing ACL injuries in soccer.
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    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses The Pain Associated with Muscle Pulls in Soccer
    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses The Pain Associated with Muscle Pulls in Soccer
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    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses ankle sprains in soccer.
    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses ankle sprains in soccer.
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    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses preventing muscle pulls in soccer.
    Jody Wiebe, physiotherapist, discusses preventing muscle pulls in soccer.
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    Ashley Charlebois, RD, discusses diet for soccer players.
    Ashley Charlebois, RD, discusses diet for soccer players.
  • Preventing ACL Injuries in Soccer

    For people who play soccer and are interested in preventing or reducing the risk of ACL injuries from happening, there are several programs that have been developed to reduce this risk.  

    For example, the PEP program and the FIFA 11 program are examples.  They're comprehensive, exercise-based approaches to reducing the risk and they usually involve a dynamic warm up, leg stretching, and strengthening specific exercises, balance and proprioception training, stand – landing and stopping techniques as well as sport specific agility training. 

    Usually, these exercise programs last about 15 to 20 minutes and should be completed about three or four times per week.  

    The most important thing for these exercise programs is that the coaches and the trainers are emphasizing proper technique during all exercises and this is the key to minimizing ACL injuries from happening on the field.  

    A good place to start for getting involved in an ACL prevention program is speaking to a physiotherapist. They can set you on the right path with appropriate exercises to do – directed specifically towards you and your needs as well. Also, ensuring that your coach or trainer has experience in dealing with ACL prevention programs and they are well versed in that field.

    Presenter: Ms. Jody Wiebe, Physiotherapist, Surrey, BC

    Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist


     

  • ACL Injuries - Knee Injuries


    The ACL – ACL injuries tend to happen when the foot is in the planted position, the foot is pronated, the knee is knocked in or the lower leg is kind of rotated inwards – that really puts the individual at risk for tearing the ACL.  

    Also, if the knee – during functional motions if the knee is in a more extended position versus bent, so during training sessions it’s really important that the individual themselves and the coaches are promoting proper body mechanics and proper techniques.  

    To prevent ACL injuries from happening on the soccer field, it’s important to remember that soft landings are important, the knee should be tracking over the foot, there should be good control through the arch and the foot itself, and good core stability. There are also other things involved.  

    If you have any other questions about how to prevent ACL injuries from happening, speak to your physiotherapist. And also, your coach and your trainer can help you with this as well.

    Presenter: Ms. Jody Wiebe, Physiotherapist, Surrey, BC

    Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

  • Ankle Injuries, Pain and Sprains in Soccer

    Ankle sprains commonly occur in soccer due to the physical nature of the sport and the player-to-player contact.

    The cleats that are worn while playing soccer have little to no ankle stability. There are also lots of quick changes in direction, pivoting, and that kind of thing involved on the field.

    As well as the terrain, itself, depending on the weather conditions the grass, or the turf can – doesn’t have a lot of give and the foot can get stuck and roll out, causing an ankle sprain.  

    If soccer players are interested in finding out more about how these conditions can lead to ankle sprains, they can speak to their doctor, their physiotherapist, as well as their coach.

    Presenter: Ms. Jody Wiebe, Physiotherapist, Surrey, BC

    Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

  • Preventing ACL Injuries When Playing Soccer

    For people who play soccer and are interested in preventing or reducing the risk of ACL injuries from happening, there are several programs that have been developed to reduce this risk.  

    For example, the PEP program and the FIFA 11 program are examples.  They're comprehensive, exercise-based approaches to reducing the risk and they usually involve a dynamic warm up, leg stretching, and strengthening specific exercises, balance and proprioception training, stand – landing and stopping techniques as well as sport specific agility training. 

    Usually, these exercise programs last about 15 to 20 minutes and should be completed about three or four times per week.  

    The most important thing for these exercise programs is that the coaches and the trainers are emphasizing proper technique during all exercises and this is the key to minimizing ACL injuries from happening on the field.  

    A good place to start for getting involved in an ACL prevention program is speaking to a physiotherapist. They can set you on the right path with appropriate exercises to do – directed specifically towards you and your needs as well. Also, ensuring that your coach or trainer has experience in dealing with ACL prevention programs and they are well versed in that field. Often seeing a local family physician or a physiotherapist in conjunction with a registered dietitian and athletic therapist is a great option to take control of this condition. Smart Food Now and exercise is also optominal for overall health.    

    Presenter: Ms. Jody Wiebe, Physiotherapist, Surrey, BC

    Now Health Network Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

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