Dr. Dean Elterman MD, MSc, FRCSC Urologist discusses Contino®, a new technology to deal with Male incontinence
Walking Exercise - Prostate Cancer Exercise Program; Mr. Nick Pratap, BSc, Kin, Clinical Exercise Physiologist
Dr. Miles Mannas, MD, MSc., FRCSC, Urologist and Sarah Ware, RD, Registered Dietician, talk about the health benefits of beets and beet greens in relation to prostate cancer.
Dr. Miles Mannas, Uro-oncologist, Sarah Ware, Registered Dietician, and Nick Pratap, Kinesiologist, talk about the health benefits of tomatoes in relation to prostate cancer.

What is Local Urologist

 A local urologist is a medical doctor who specializes in health conditions that affect the urinary tract (kidneys, bladder and ureters) in men, women and children. A local urologist also diagnoses and treats diseases that affect the reproductive system. Some of the conditions a local urologist might treat include kidney stones, Peyronie's disease, urinary tract infections (UTIs), prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction (ED), low pelvic organ prolapse and bedwetting. If your local family physician thinks that you may benefit from seeing a local urologist, they can refer you.

Some of the tools a local urologist may use to diagnose conditions include urine tests; CT scan; MRI scan; ultrasound imaging; cystoscopy, which uses a cystoscope to look at the bladder and urethra; ureteroscopy, which looks inside the ureters and kidneys; and prostate biopsy, which involves taking a small tissue sample. Depending on the diagnosis, a local urologist may perform or refer patients for antibiotics, medication, radiation, chemotherapy, surgery and/or lifestyle changes. The Contino Patient Support Program centers around you and pairs you with a Contino Nurse throughout your journey. Your Contino nurse is just a phone call away.  

If you are concerned about male incontinence, a local urologist can also help. Male incontinence can be a result of various medical conditions, including diabetes, an enlarged prostate or an overactive bladder. Fortunately, there are many solutions for male incontinence, including seeing a local urologist for treatment options and using a product such as Contino®. Contino is a urethral catheter that a man inserts, and it stops the flow of urine, preventing leakage. It's a simple device that allows a man to release his urine whenever it's convenient for him. It is so small it fits into a container the size of an eyeglass case. In addition to male incontinence products like Contino, there are also men's underwear and pads that can control urine leakage and prevent odors. Some men also find that doing Kegel exercises and avoiding coffee or alcohol before bed helps male incontinence. If you’d like more information about how a local urologist can help you, including how Contino might be the right product for your male incontinence or overactive bladder, start a conversation with your local family physician. 

Talk to your local family physician for more information. Whether you have low testosterone or a bladder infection, start by talking to your local family physician for a referral to a local urologist. Urethral inserts like Contino® are temporarily inserted into the urethra (the tube which carries urine to the outside of the body) to prevent or reduce bladder leakage. The main type of surgery for prostate cancer is a radical prostatectomy. In this operation, the surgeon removes the entire prostate gland plus some of the tissue around it, including the seminal vesicles.

Muscle stiffness and bad posture can lead to unwanted joint pain and potential injury. Working with a clinical exercise physiologist to devise a routine that improves flexibility through stretching can be helpful. Examples include traditional Yoga, or a full body stretch.

Aerobic exercise is a cornerstone in any exercise prescription. The guidelines suggest 150 minutes of moderate or 75min of vigorous aerobic exercise a week. It can be helpful to focus on activities patients enjoy, whether it be walking, cycling or dancing to name a few. Patients on ADT can have an accelerated reduction in muscle mass and strength. This is often combined with the steady decline in strength that comes with aging. In these patients, it’s recommended to perform strength training 2-3x/week, on non-consecutive days, targeting the major muscles of the body to maintain strength and lean muscle. This can be done using traditional weights, or more simply their own bodyweight.

Any movement is better than no movement and reducing sedentary behaviour is important. This is shown to be a major factor in helping reduce fatigue in many cancer patients. Getting up every hour and walking around for a few minutes has significant benefit. This keeps the body engaged, improves circulation and blood flow and keeps muscles active throughout the day. Muscle stiffness and bad posture can lead to unwanted joint pain and potential injury. Working with a clinical exercise physiologist to devise a routine that improves flexibility through stretching can be helpful. Examples include traditional Yoga, or a full body stretch.

Many hospital visits among seniors are due to falls. And patients on ADT who develop osteoporosis are at increased risk of fractures. Therefore, improving balance is critical for fall prevention. A clinical exercise physiologist can suggest balance exercises suitable for you.

If you have further questions about prostate cancer treatments and how a clinical exercise physiologist can help, please don’t hesitate to speak to your family physician or prostate cancer specialist.

 

Dr. Bobby Shayegan

Dr. Bobby Shayegan

(MD, FRCSC)
Urologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Edward Matsumoto

Dr. Edward Matsumoto

Urologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Ethan Grober

Dr. Ethan Grober

Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Keith Jarvi

Dr. Keith Jarvi

Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Dean Elterman

Dr. Dean Elterman

MD, MSc, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Kenneth Pace

Dr. Kenneth Pace

MD, MSc, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Robert Stewart

Dr. Robert Stewart

MD, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Jason Lee

Dr. Jason Lee

MD, MHPE, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Neil Fleshner

Dr. Neil Fleshner

MD, MPH, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Darius Bagli

Dr. Darius Bagli

MDCM, FRCSC, FAAP, FACS
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Tony Finelli

Dr. Tony Finelli

MD, MSC, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, Ontario, ON
Dr. Rob Hamilton

Dr. Rob Hamilton

MD, MPH, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Nathan Perlis

Dr. Nathan Perlis

MD, MSC, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, Ontario, ON
Dr. Magdy Hassouna

Dr. Magdy Hassouna

MD, PHD, FRCSC, FACS
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Jack Barkin Barkin

Jack Barkin Barkin

MD, FICS, FACS, DABU, MHM, CCPE, FRCS
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Sidney Radomski MD, FRCSC Radomski

Dr. Sidney Radomski MD, FRCSC Radomski

MD, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, Ontario, ON
Dr. Alexandre Zlotta

Dr. Alexandre Zlotta

MD, PHD, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Girish Kulkarni

Dr. Girish Kulkarni

MD, PHD, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Miguel Llano

Dr. Miguel Llano

Urologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Yonah Krakowsky

Dr. Yonah Krakowsky

MD, FRCSC
Urologist
Toronto, ON
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