Tamarah Nerreter, physiotherapist, discusses lower back pain during pregnancy.
Gordon Bohlmann, BSc (PT), CGIMS, OMT, BSc HMS, Physiotherapist, discusses physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis.
Gordon Bohlmann, BSc.PT, IMS, Physiotherapist, discusses what is a triangular fibrocartilage complex injury of the wrist (TFCC)
Margharita Cirillo, MPT, Physiotherapist, discusses what types of injuries cause elbow pain and how are they treated.

What is Local Physiotherapist

A local physiotherapist is a wellness provider that uses a variety of non-invasive techniques to treat patients. A local physiotherapist may use spinal adjustment, manual adjustment, PRP (platelet-rich plasma) therapy, musculoskeletal ultrasound and breathing exercises. Many patients who are recovering from a sports injury or surgery work with a local physiotherapist during the recovery process. Patients with chronic diseases such as osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, cancer, arthritis and diabetes often work with a local physiotherapist to help them manage their condition. Whether you have low back pain or are pregnant, your local family physician can refer you to a local physiotherapist. 

Ultrasound: Physiotherapists use ultrasound for connective tissue injuries. Ultrasound uses sound waves to generate heat deep in the body, loosening up tissues so they’re better prepared for exercise or manual therapy.   Often seeing your local family Physician is a great starting place for referrals to your local Massage Therapist or your local chiropractor to help with massage and skeletal adjustments. A local Physiotherapist or local athletic trainer can help with strength and bruised muscles. Acupuncture is often recommended for chronic pain in association with your local physiotherapist 

Here are some other physiotherapy treatments your local physiotherapist may recommend:

Here are 10 physiotherapy treatments physiotherapists commonly use:

1. The assessment: Before you can begin, your physical therapist will do an evaluation. You may not think of this as a typical treatment, but it's an integral part of creating a physiotherapy plan to get to the root of the problem.

2. Manual therapy: This is a modality that local physiotherapists use for many injuries. This hands-on approach refers to many things, including therapeutic massage and assisted stretching and exercise.

3. Ice: Best for injuries with swelling and inflammation, ice treatment constricts blood vessels, which can reduce and even prevent inflammation after a soft tissue injury.

4. Heat: Best for injuries involving muscular spasms and tightness, heat therapy can increase mobility and decrease pain following soft tissue injuries.

5. Traction: This is a physiotherapy modality that’s often used for disc herniation. If you’re experiencing back pain, traction involves separating your vertebrae to reduce the compression on disc cartilage.

6. Range-of-motion exercises: You’ll do some assisted exercises and exercise at home (including walking exercise). Physiotherapists will recommend exercise after virtually any injury. Your physiotherapist will show you strengthening exercises based on your condition and current health.

7. Functional electrical stimulation: If you’re trying to restore muscular strength, your physiotherapist may recommend electrical stimulation, also called ESTIM. The physiotherapist will apply an electrical stimulus to causes contractions of the muscles, hopefully restoring movement and function.

8. Laser: Your physiotherapist may use a low-level laser for muscular or connective tissue injuries to reduce inflammation, pain and muscle fatigue.

9. Kinesio taping: This flexible, colourful tape is applied to the skin to stabilize muscles and joints while you undergo physiotherapy treatment. It will stay in place while you’re doing range-of-motion exercises. If you have a disability, injury or illness, your physiotherapist can help you customize a safe and effective treatment plan. A meniscus tear is a tear in the fiber cartilage of the knee joint. Between the two long bones of the leg lie two C-shaped discs of fiber cartilage, which serve as primary shock absorbers for the knee joint. They protect the articulate cartilage surfaces of the femur and the tibia from grinding against one another.

 

 

Reema Parikh

Reema Parikh

Physiotherapist
Washington, DC
Dr. Stephanie House PT, DPT

Dr. Stephanie House PT, DPT

Physiotherapist
Charlottesville, VA
Ms. Rupal Yadav

Ms. Rupal Yadav

Physiotherapist
New York, NY
Anneliese Ruggeri

Anneliese Ruggeri

Physiotherapist
Middlebury, CT
Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Physiotherapist
Fonthill, ON
Chritine Bridle

Chritine Bridle

FCAMPT, CAFCI
Physiotherapist
St Catherines, ON
Paul Skiba

Paul Skiba

B.Kin. (Hons.), RKin, RHN, CEP
Physiotherapist
St. Catharines, ON
Nancy Ma

Nancy Ma

Physiotherapist
Hamilton, AB
Sacha Bhandal

Sacha Bhandal

Physiotherapist
Hamilton, ON
Laurie McLaughlin

Laurie McLaughlin

Physiotherapist
Hamilton,, ON
Tim Rogers

Tim Rogers

Physiotherapist
Hamilton, ON
Richard MacLean

Richard MacLean

Physiotherapist
Burlington, ON
Claire Corbett

Claire Corbett

Physiotherapist
Oakville, ON
Robyn Synnott

Robyn Synnott

Physiotherapist
Oakville, ON
Menaga Thanigasalam

Menaga Thanigasalam

Physiotherapist
Mississauga, ON
Dr. Charlotte Anderson

Dr. Charlotte Anderson

Physiotherapist
Toronto, ON
Matthew Laing

Matthew Laing

Physiotherapist
Toronto, ON
Alexandra Sandler

Alexandra Sandler

Physiotherapist
Toronto, ON
Mr. Aly J. Chunara

Mr. Aly J. Chunara

PT-Cleveland Clinic Canada Sports Health
Physiotherapist
Toronto, ON
Kimberley Jelly

Kimberley Jelly

Physiotherapist
Toronto, ON
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